Sexual deviance

psychology sexual deviance

Defining sexual deviance Pages 19 Thus far, we have discussed many socially constructed concepts including gender, sexuality, crime, and deviance, to name a few. We have also emphasized their everchanging cultural and temporal variance and the importance of social power in their construction.

sexually deviant behavior meaning

Sexual deviance can be defined as sexual behaviors and identities perceived as deviant in a particular society. In that version, for example, a man cannot be classified as a transvestite—however much he cross-dresses and however sexually exciting that is to him—unless he is unhappy about this activity or impaired by it.

The research then concluded that the data seemed to suggest paraphilias and homosexuality as two distinct categories, but regarded the conclusion as "quite tentative" given the current limited understanding of paraphilias.

In this conception, having a paraphilia would be a necessary but not a sufficient condition for having a paraphilic disorder.

the only paraphilia that is found with some degree of frequency in females is

It also provided seven nonexhaustive examples of NOS paraphilias, which besides zoophilia included telephone scatologianecrophilia, partialismcoprophiliaklismaphiliaand urophilia. Societies classify certain desires, acts, and identities as normal, respectable, good, healthy, and moral; other forms of sexuality are classified as unhealthy, abnormal, sinful, and immoral.

Martin Kafka writes, "Sexual disorders once considered paraphilias e. Sexual deviance, then, is a social construct-one that is created not only through social interactions, but also, through perceptions: All societies create sexual hierarchies that establish boundaries between good and bad or legitimate and illicit sexualities.

While much of the historical literature revolves around the controversy over homosexuality, this article also reviews the recent medicohistorical and sociohistorical work on other forms of sexual deviance, including the diagnostic categories listed in the latest edition, the DSM-IV-TR: exhibitionism, voyeurism, fetishism, frotteurism, pedophilia, sexual masochism, sexual sadism, and transvestic fetishism.

There are a number of clinically recognised disorders of sexual or paraphiliac function, including fetishism the object of sexual desire is either an inanimate object or a non-genital part of the human anatomyvoyeurism the covert viewing of other individuals who are naked, undressing, or engaged in sexual activity and chronophilia the primary sexual attraction is to a particular age group.

Psychological perspectives of explaining sexual deviance

In that version, for example, a man cannot be classified as a transvestite—however much he cross-dresses and however sexually exciting that is to him—unless he is unhappy about this activity or impaired by it. Psychologists generally refer to non-traditional sexual behaviour as sexual deviation or, in cases where the specific object of arousal is unusual, as paraphilia. The perception of what is sexually perverted shifts dependent on who is talking about it. They are Martin Kafka writes, "Sexual disorders once considered paraphilias e. Pathologizing sexual deviance: a history. We have also emphasized their everchanging cultural and temporal variance and the importance of social power in their construction. The only diagnostic guidance was that sexual deviation should have been "reserved for deviant sexuality which [was] not symptomatic of more extensive syndromes, such as schizophrenic or obsessional reactions".
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THE SEXUAL DEVIANT (SEXUAL PSYCHOPATH)