Character analysis of connie in where are you going where have you been by joyce carol oates

Where are you going where have you been quotes

The example essays in Kibin's library were written by real students for real classes. What makes you cringe? He tells her that he won't follow her inside, but as soon as she touches the phone, he doesn't have to keep his promise. Advertising Looking for essay on american literature? His strange first name is close to the name Eddie, the name of the boy Connie was with on the night she first saw Arnold. Too often, women feel they're voices cannot be heard. Eventually, she got up, and Arnold was standing in the doorway. She behaves one way in her home and an entirely different way when she is elsewhere. Are these essay examples edited? She met a guy named Eddie and sent her friend away while she sat in his car with him for a few hours. This shows that men think that they have the right to do whatever they want to a woman sexually, and that women are supposed to be submissive and just take it.

He seems like a demonic figure, perhaps even a nightmare rather than an actual human being, but his true character is never fully clarified. To protect the anonymity of contributors, we've removed their names and personal information from the essays.

Where are you going where have you been theme

He says that the place Connie came from does not exist anymore, and where she planned to go is cancelled out Oates n. As she walked outside with Arnold, "she was hollow with what had been fear, but was now just an emptiness" This shows that some men are only concerned with their own sexual pleasure, and don't care about making sure that the woman is satisfied. In the end, Connie gives in to the pressures of a patriarchal society. Connie is giving up her independence to go with Arnold. She's the "pretty one" in the family and thinks she's superior to her mother and her sister because of it. Arnold has pale, almost translucent skin; his hair looks like a wig; and he appears both old and young at the same time. He tells her that, even though she may not like it at first, she will love him once he is done. This also may represent the fact that many women think that, if they just give in to the sexual advances of a man, that they will fall in love with each other and everything will be all right. And—at least initially—Arnold Friend is shown as being appealing because he conforms to the aesthetics she knows and approves of: Connie liked the way he was dressed, which was the way all of them dressed.

She knows little about reality or what adulthood actually entails, preferring to lose herself in the rosy ideas of romance that her beloved pop songs promote.

Connie just wants a cute boy with a nice car. Let us know! Who wrote this essay? Like most teenage girls, Connie spends a lot of time hanging out with her friends at the shopping mall, checking out cute boys. She doesn't really care about the guys' personalities, just that they are cute and have nice cars.

Where are you going where have you been point of view

Did you find something inaccurate, misleading, abusive, or otherwise problematic in this essay example? She desperately wants to be attractive to older men, but once an older man—Arnold—actually pays her explicit sexual attention, she is terrified. You know how looking at a math problem similar to the one you're stuck on can help you get unstuck? Kennedy and Dana Gioia. Arnold explains Connie that independence is equaled to becoming adult and this world may be cruel and unfair. She goes inside and locks the door, but Arnold informs her that there is no point in locking it, as the screen door can't keep him out. This also may represent the fact that many women think that, if they just give in to the sexual advances of a man, that they will fall in love with each other and everything will be all right. Later in the story, while looking back on the different guys she met at the restaurant, she thought to herself "[b]ut all the boys fell back and dissolved into a single face that was not even a face, but an idea June is nearly the opposite of Connie. His strange first name is close to the name Eddie, the name of the boy Connie was with on the night she first saw Arnold. She met a guy named Eddie and sent her friend away while she sat in his car with him for a few hours. This represents the tendency that some women have to willingly allow their lives to be controlled by men.

Arnold says as if warning Connie. Connie was not as well.

where are you going where have you been essay
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